How To Choose The Best Rock Climbing Shoes That Really Right For You

rock climning

Rock climbing shoes are the interface between you and the rock, and the wrong type of shoe or fit can hold you back. So, choosing a climbing shoes that are really right for you it’s obviously important! And here are out top pick of buying guide for choosing the best rock climbing shoes. Okay,  let’s have a look at below video and some details.

Climbing Shoe Type

Style 1. Neutral

These shoes have very downturned toes and lots of heel tension to put your feet in a strong and powerful position for challenging overhanging climbs. Most aggressive shoes have an asymmetric shape that curves toward the big toe, focusing power over the toe for precise placements on small holds. Because of the snug fit and downturned shape, climbers typically wear aggressive shoes for single-pitch sport climbs and routes at the gym rather than all-day multi-pitch climbs.

Pros:

  • Very downturned shape puts your feet in a strong, powerful position for overhanging sport climbs, routes at the gym and boulder problems
  • Typically have stickier rubber and thinner soles than neutral shoes for better grip and feel

 

Cons:

  • Less comfortable than moderate and neutral shoes
  • Downturn shape doesn’t fit into cracks as well or smear as well as neutral and moderate shoes
  • Stickier rubber and thinner soles wear faster than rubber on neutral shoes

Style 2. Moderate:

Moderate Climbing Shoe
Moderate shoes are distinguished by their slightly downturned shape (also called camber) that makes them good for technical climbing. These all-purpose shoes can handle slab routes, crack climbs, long multi-pitch climbs and slightly overhung sport routes.Pros:

  • Downturned shape puts your feet into a stronger, more powerful position than neutral shoes, helping you climb more challenging routes
  • Typically have stickier rubber and thinner soles than neutral shoes for better grip and feel
  • More comfortable than aggressive shoes

Cons:

  • Not as performance-oriented as aggressive shoes, making them less suited for very overhung routes and challenging boulder problems
  • Less comfortable than neutral shoes
  • Stickier rubber and thinner soles wear faster than rubber on neutral shoes

 

Style 3. Aggressive:

Aggressive Climbing Shoe
These shoes have very downturned toes and lots of heel tension to put your feet in a strong and powerful position for challenging overhanging climbs. Most aggressive shoes have an asymmetric shape that curves toward the big toe, focusing power over the toe for precise placements on small holds. Because of the snug fit and downturned shape, climbers typically wear aggressive shoes for single-pitch sport climbs and routes at the gym rather than all-day multi-pitch climbs.Pros:

  • Very downturned shape puts your feet in a strong, powerful position for overhanging sport climbs, routes at the gym and boulder problems
  • Typically have stickier rubber and thinner soles than neutral shoes for better grip and feel

Cons:

  • Less comfortable than moderate and neutral shoes
  • Downturn shape doesn’t fit into cracks as well or smear as well as neutral and moderate shoes
  • Stickier rubber and thinner soles wear faster than rubber on neutral shoes

Climbing Shoe Fit Tips

Climbing Shoe Fit Tips

Some general fitting rules:

  • Avoid shoes that have dead space between your toes and the inside of the shoe since the shoe will not stay rigid when you place your toes on a foothold.
  • Make sure your toes are flat or comfortably curved and that your toe knuckles aren’t bunched painfully against the top of the shoe.
  • Your heel should have a snug fit. When you are standing on your toe, ensure the back of the shoe doesn’t pinch the bottom of your Achilles tendon.
  • Everyone’s feet bend differently, but if a shoe is difficult to slip on your foot, it is probably too tight.
  • In general, the higher performance the shoe, the tighter the fit.

 

Fit is a very important factor in finding a good pair of rock shoes. If possible, compare and try on a variety of models. Here are some fit tips to help you find the right shoes:

1. Shop in the afternoon: Your feet can swell up to a full size during the day. Go for a walk, run or, better yet, climb before you shop. Keep in mind that you’ll most likely be sockless, since the inside of shoes are designed to work with skin to reduce slippage. For cold, alpine conditions that require a sock, buy a comfortable shoe that’s about a half-size too big.

2. The only sure way is to try them on: Ideally, you should shop in person so you can easily try on multiple sizes. If you are buying online, order more than one size and return what doesn’t fit. Try on shoes at home to make sure there are no hotspots.

3. Be flexible when it comes to size: There is no rock-shoe sizing standard, and everybody’s feet are different.

Rock shoes come in U.S., European and United Kingdom sizes. Check shoe charts for size translations.

Keep in mind that a size 42 from one brand will fit differently than a size 42 in another. All rock shoe companies have multiple lasts, and every time they change materials or the design, it changes the fit—even with the same last.

When you try on a lace-up shoe, undo the laces completely and then tighten them accordingly from toe to ankle.

4. Know what fit you want: Rock shoes do not need to fit painfully—in fact, foot pain will prevent you from climbing to your full potential and may cause problems like blisters, bunions and calluses.

You will, however, get more performance out of a shoe in which your toes are slightly bent at the knuckles. As the slingshot heel rand (the rubber that wraps around the heel and connects to the midsole) becomes tighter, the foot is pushed forward in the shoe. This positions the toes more powerfully, but also keeps them in a curved-to-crimped position.